Growing divide

Steve Schnapp responds to the question, "Why Occupy?"

— Maz
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UFE popular educator, Steve Schnapp, names extreme economic inequality as a key reason why others should join the Occupy Movement. He explains in this interview with local filmmaker Richard Bergin from the site of Occupy Boston.

Steve Schnapp responds to the question, "Why Occupy?"

— Maz
See video

UFE popular educator, Steve Schnapp, names extreme economic inequality as a key reason why others should join the Occupy Movement. He explains in this interview with local filmmaker Richard Bergin from the site of Occupy Boston.

How Do We Coddle the Super-Wealthy?

— Shannon M.
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The rules that shape our economy have been influenced by the super-wealthy over the past 30 years, and tilted in their favor. Here's how. (See sources here.)

Poverty Gets A Seat On the Bus

— Maz
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The relentless focus on federal budget-cutting has burned up so much of the country's political oxygen that it nearly choked off dialogue on a more immediate, urgent concern: poverty. Two well-known Americans tried to move this point to the front of the bus last month with their "Poverty Tour: A Call to Conscience." [...] Unlike the abstractions of long-term deficit projections, poverty is a tangible, here-and-now reality. 

"Tax Us? Go for it," say these rich people

— Maz
image h/t AMNY

As a phenomenally wealthy individual, Warren Buffett feels "coddled" by the U.S. government, which has for decades asked him to pay less and less into public coffers. His recent New York Times op-ed was a brazen call for Congress to raise taxes on richest people in the U.S. Buffett's not-so-wild sentiment received due support from members of UFE's Responsible Wealth project (RW).

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