Racial Wealth Divide

Shopping and Race Relations

— Maz

This photo and audio project is a re-telling of a hilarious true story. It makes light of those seemingly trivial interactions that suggest we're not actually living in a post-racial society. Dealing with the economic disparities and social decays that heavily affect communities of color has to start with that collective realization. Race doesn't have to be a big deal. But, it still matters. See United for a Fair Economy's annual State of the Dream reports, released every January in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr., to learn more about the history, current state, and solutions to the growing racial wealth divide.

INFOGRAPHIC: The House Doesn't Always Win

— Maz
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Housing, a cornerstone of the "American Dream," is the largest form of privately wealth held by families across the United States. This infographic draws attention to the intersection of housing as both a globally-recognized human right and as a commodity in a global stock market controlled by the wealthy.

Racial Wealth Divide: Why Housing Matters

— Maz
infographic

 Infographic design by Design Action Collective

DOWNLOAD THIS INFOGRAPHIC! (pdf):  English  |  Spanish

Housing, a cornerstone of the "American Dream," is the largest form of privately wealth held by families across the United States. This infographic draws attention to the intersection of housing as both a globally-recognized human right and as a commodity in a global stock market controlled by the wealthy. We urge readers to acknowledge the history behind the long-standing racial wealth divide and to consider the interplay between federal housing policies and risky financial practices and their impacts on the divide.

For more on housing and the racial wealth divide, see UFE's 2013 MLK day report:
State of the Dream 2013: A Long Way From Home

June 2013: UFE Training of Trainers in Boston

— Maz
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UFE is hosting our renowned Training of Trainers Institute this June in our own backyard in Boston, MA. We invite organizers, activists, educators, students, and others across the U.S. who want to join and advance the movement for greater equality.

Defending the Youth Economic Justice Movement

— Maz
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As banal as it sounds, young people kind of are our future. Peaceful protest has helped to generate positive change throughout U.S. history. Should we not encourage the youth community to be more engaged in this way?

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